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20121001
20121031
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the winners, so to speak, and the losers because it is asymmetric, right? >>> now last year hurricane irene's initial projections were $7 billion. turned out to be $15 billion. there were a lot of ancillaries once the checks come out from the government and private insurers. stimulus to the gdp. not big enough to move the needle. this one we're getting initial projections is much bigger. the two cohorts in stocks most impacted the home depot-like places, let's call them that, they were basically moved up a day ahead of the storm and then pulled off once the market turned out to be. >> we didn't see much of that on friday in terms of home depot or at lowe's which i thought was interesting and most of the retailers have closed their books on saturday, last saturday, so the impact of the storm won't actually be seen until the following quarter or the next month when they report retail sales. lowe's is the exception. they closed books on saturday. all the runup, the generators they've sold, the batteries, the flashlights, those things were almost sold out pretty much across the board. that shou
storms in 1878 and 1903 and then hurricane irene became a tropical storm when it hit just last year. now, hurricane irene caused roughly $15 billion in damage all across the northeast. the state of new jersey alone got $275 million in federal assistance most going to homeowners and flooding private insurers. here in cape may, commercial fishing is the big business. a billion dollars in revenue for new jersey. further up atlantic city of course we know all of those casinos, 12 flagship institutions across the boardwalk are closed and halloween parties canceled. atlantic city is lower lying. that will be a very, very big hit. the place to watch. evacuated yesterday by 4:00 p.m. and chris christie declaring a state of emergency there because of how bad conditions are supposed to get there. it's only 9:00 a.m. right now. you can see how bad it's getting. the waves are spilling up into the dunes and there is flooding in the street. there's structural damage just a couple blocks away that we'll check out. definitely a strengthening storm here on the shore of new jersey. carl? >> kayla, thank y
. no doubt about it. you look at hurricane irene, tropical storm irene, the cost to state and local governments of new york was $1.2 billion. that was for recovery and cleanup. clearly this is going to be an economic hit on us. dimensions of which we just don't know yet. >> it's interesting how it impacted with mta shut down and people unable to get into manhattan for example. lower manhattan almost deserted. certainly very few businesses operating and few businesses operating at night. how does that work its way through the economy? >> very significantly. we take for granted the extensive public transportation system we have in the new york city metropolitan area. it's the life blood to our economy. when that life blood is not pumping, it will have a serious impact. it's not just how soon will trains be running but will be repair costs? they will be significant. mta had its own financing troubles particularly with regard to that capital program. they obviously weren't anticipating the kind of damage that this storm has brought. a long-term where we're at with financing for the mta
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3